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    Nicholas Andrew Martin Rodger, The Command of the Ocean. A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815

    Johnathan R. Razorback
    Johnathan R. Razorback
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    Date d'inscription : 12/08/2013
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    Nicholas Andrew Martin Rodger, The Command of the Ocean. A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815 Empty Nicholas Andrew Martin Rodger, The Command of the Ocean. A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815

    Message par Johnathan R. Razorback le Mar 25 Sep - 19:04

    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Rodger

    "To pretend to Universal Monarchy without Fleets was long since looked, as a politick chimaera... whoever commands the ocean, commands the trade of the world, and whoever commands the trade of the world, commands the riches of the world, and whoever is master of that, commands the world itself."
    -John Evelyn, Navigation and Commerce, their Origin and Progress (London, 1674), pp.15-17 and 32-3.

    "All dates up to 1752 are Old Style [Julian Calendar] unless otherwise indicated." (p.XIX)

    "English warships had been classified into five or six "rates" since the late sixteenth century. A scheme of six Rates defined by the size of their crews was adopted in 1653. There followed a number of different schemes, mostly based on numbers of guns. As overhauled and standardized by Pepys in 1677 and 1685 the classification stood thus:

    First Rates 90-100 guns.
    Second Rates 64-90 guns
    Third Rates 56-70 guns
    Fourth Rates 38-62 guns
    Fifth Rates 28-38 guns.
    Sixth Rates 4-18 guns.

    First and Second Rates had three gun decks, Third and Fourth Rates two, and these four Rates were reckoned fit to fight in the line of battle. They were therefore "ships of the line" or "line of battleships", in the terminology which became standard.
    The scheme of Rates remained in force until 1817, with continual minor adjustments as warship design developed
    ." (p.XXVI-XXVII)

    "It is in the 166 years covered by this volume that state and nation finally gained the real sovereignty of the seas around the British Isles. [...] Naval dominance of European waters was the largest, longest, most complex and expensive project ever undertaken by the British state and society. Few aspects of national life were unaffected by it, and no history of Britain can be complete which ignores it." (p.LXV)
    -Nicholas Andrew Martin Rodger, The Command of the Ocean. A Naval History of Britain, 1649-1815, London, Penguin Books, 2006 (2004 pour la première édition, 907 pages.




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    « La racine de toute doctrine erronée se trouve dans une erreur philosophique. [...] Le rôle des penseurs vrais, mais aussi une tâche de tout homme libre, est de comprendre les possibles conséquences de chaque principe ou idée, de chaque décision avant qu'elle se change en action, afin d'exclure aussi bien ses conséquences nuisibles que la possibilité de tromperie. » -Jacob Sher, Avertissement contre le socialisme, Introduction à « Tableaux de l'avenir social-démocrate » d'Eugen Richter, avril 1998.

    "La vraie volupté est remportée comme une victoire sur la tristesse [...] Il n’y a pas de grands voluptueux sans une certaine mélancolie, pas de mélancoliques qui ne soient des voluptueux trahis." -Albert Thibaudet, La vie de Maurice Barrès, in Trente ans de vie française, volume 2, Éditions de la Nouvelle Revue Française, 1919, 312 pages, p.40.


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